Tag Archives: injustice

Kha Khan

Hubbard always liked exotic things, and fancied himself a student of history. He brought up historical references in his lectures, describing them with authority and adding is opinion about them and providing the last word about what should be thought about them. It didn’t matter what the subject was, he would tell the anecdote, and then pronounce judgement on it with finality. Nothing more needs to be said; his point of view is all you need. Subjects included taxes, organizational structures, various leaders, various philosophers, opinions about wars, opinions about doctors and medicine, etc.

In that context, it makes sense that Hubbard would take up something like “Kha Khan.” Hubbard said it was a title from The East. If the emperor designates someone a “Kha Khan,” he is given a status above all else, to the point where he could do virtually anything and be forgiven. Hubbard said the Kha Khan would be forgiven the death penalty ten times. In fact, a Kha Khan is historically an emperor, not a status the emperor bestows on others.

Hubbard adopted this status in Scientology, and handed it out to some of his more dedicated and capable staff members. In Scientology terms, Kha Khan meant the recipient could do ten things with impunity that normally would get the person kicked out of  the church.

Kha Khan is the perfect summation of what is wrong with Scientology ethics and admin. Here we have a status of “this guy is such an A player, such a mensch, that he can (not literally) kill ten people and get away with it. He can screw up hugely ten times with impunity! All hail the Kha Khan!” And yet, I’ve never known of a Kha Khan to ever be forgiven anything, and every one has been busted within a year or two of the status. So, what we have is a person who does something great, rises above the herd, and then gets smacked down shortly thereafter. Kha Khan becomes a nice, big target. And that is Scientology organizational methodology in a nutshell.

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Happy Birthday Ron!

Happy birthday to L. Ron Hubbard. Ironically, today is the day Alex Gibney’s “Going Clear” documentary is premiering in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York. I have not seen the movie yet, but by all accounts, it appears to be a compelling piece of work. My hope is that it supplies enough pressure to the church and folks like Tom Cruise and John Travolta that significant changes happen in the organization. One thing is sure, it will contribute to the motion.